chubachus:

American soldiers carrying a wounded man to the rear during the Meuse-Argonne Offensive, 1918. Animated stereoview

ghettogether:

1st Field Artillery Brigade, 1st Division, 1919

Herbert Kimmel, Private, Medical Detachment, 134th Field Artillery, 37th Division AEF.

"For my faithful Dad: Thanks for your letters….I received uncle Ezra’s letter and papers regarding the Superannuation Fund. As soon as I get them fixed up I’ll send them to the Bishop. With a Government Life Insurance Policy, and a Superannuation Fund at my disposal, all that I will need to assure me of a brilliant old age will be a rich wife. Do I hear any offers? Dont be backward girls, I’m not as mean as I look. If you get tired of me before I shuffle off of this globe you can ship me to the Soldiers’ Home. With this added inducement, are there no bids? Why delay?

Time for drill, so goodbye

Herbert”

  1. Camera: Samsung SCH-I545
  2. Aperture: f/2.2
  3. Exposure: 1/15th
  4. Focal Length: 4mm

bag-of-dirt:

Macedonian partisan soldiers of the People’s Liberation Army of Macedonia (part of the larger National Liberation Army and Partisan Detachments of Yugoslavia) march through the streets of Skopje following the defeat of Axis forces in the National Liberation War of Macedonia. Skopje came under German occupation on 7 April 1941 and was later occupied by Axis Bulgarian forces, and was liberated on 13 November 1944 by the People’s Liberation Army of Macedonia together with units of the newly allied Bulgarian People’s Army (Bulgaria having switched sides in the war in September of 1944). Skopje, Macedonia, Yugoslavia (now, Republic of Macedonia). November 1944.

Madsens!

CELIA at Wright State: Echoes of the Great War

Here’s the official banner for this year’s CELIA project. For further details, go to the CELIA site

A Dayton Doughboy rests in Scotland
At approximately 5:40pm on February 5, 1918, the skipper of the German u-boat UB-77 spotted the Anchor Line luxury liner SS TUSCANIA just a few miles off the Scottish island of Islay. UB-77 fired two torpedoes; one of them hit TUSCANIA squarely amidships. She did not sink immediately, but there was significant damage, and many of the lifeboats were destroyed in the resulting blast.
TUSCANIA had been pressed into service as an American troopship, and was carrying 2000 US soldiers, including members of three aero squadrons, elements of the 32nd Division, and the 6th Battalion, 20th Engineer Regiment (Forestry). Aboard TUSCANIA was twenty-three year-old Stanley Roy Augspurger. Born in Woodsdale, Butler County, Ohio, Stanley moved to Dayton with his parents in 1910 or 1911. They lived at 133 East Ridge Avenue. Stanley’s father, Walter, worked as a railroad dispatcher. When America entered the Great War in 1917, Stanley was working for the U.S. Forest Service in Oregon. He joined, appropriately enough, the 20th Engineers, one of the two huge regiments recruited from trained foresters and lumbermen, and designated specifically to harvest timber in France.
TUSCANIA did not sink immediately. It was nearly 10 o’clock that night before the liner slipped beneath the surface. The destroyers in its convoy did what they could to rescue the survivors, and indeed most of the men aboard did survive, but 230 — 201 American servicemen plus 29 members of the crew — were lost.
The men and boys of Port Ellen, Isle of Islay, turned out that night to search for survivors. They didn’t find any. What they did find were scores of bodies, washed up on the shores of Islay. These they recovered, identified as they could, and buried. Still on Islay today are four American cemeteries, at Port Charlotte, Kilnaughton, Kinabus, and Killeyan.
Stanley Augspurger was one of those who didn’t survive the sinking of TUSCANIA. He is buried in the American cemetery at Kinabus, Isle of Islay. Because he had enlisted in Oregon, his service wasn’t credited to the state of Ohio, and his name doesn’t appear on the official roster of Ohio troops in the Great War. But his grieving parents considered Dayton his home, and when the memorial was dedicated at Victory Oak Knoll in 1921 Stanley’s name was inscribed on the roll of honor there. A Dayton Doughboy rests in Scotland
At approximately 5:40pm on February 5, 1918, the skipper of the German u-boat UB-77 spotted the Anchor Line luxury liner SS TUSCANIA just a few miles off the Scottish island of Islay. UB-77 fired two torpedoes; one of them hit TUSCANIA squarely amidships. She did not sink immediately, but there was significant damage, and many of the lifeboats were destroyed in the resulting blast.
TUSCANIA had been pressed into service as an American troopship, and was carrying 2000 US soldiers, including members of three aero squadrons, elements of the 32nd Division, and the 6th Battalion, 20th Engineer Regiment (Forestry). Aboard TUSCANIA was twenty-three year-old Stanley Roy Augspurger. Born in Woodsdale, Butler County, Ohio, Stanley moved to Dayton with his parents in 1910 or 1911. They lived at 133 East Ridge Avenue. Stanley’s father, Walter, worked as a railroad dispatcher. When America entered the Great War in 1917, Stanley was working for the U.S. Forest Service in Oregon. He joined, appropriately enough, the 20th Engineers, one of the two huge regiments recruited from trained foresters and lumbermen, and designated specifically to harvest timber in France.
TUSCANIA did not sink immediately. It was nearly 10 o’clock that night before the liner slipped beneath the surface. The destroyers in its convoy did what they could to rescue the survivors, and indeed most of the men aboard did survive, but 230 — 201 American servicemen plus 29 members of the crew — were lost.
The men and boys of Port Ellen, Isle of Islay, turned out that night to search for survivors. They didn’t find any. What they did find were scores of bodies, washed up on the shores of Islay. These they recovered, identified as they could, and buried. Still on Islay today are four American cemeteries, at Port Charlotte, Kilnaughton, Kinabus, and Killeyan.
Stanley Augspurger was one of those who didn’t survive the sinking of TUSCANIA. He is buried in the American cemetery at Kinabus, Isle of Islay. Because he had enlisted in Oregon, his service wasn’t credited to the state of Ohio, and his name doesn’t appear on the official roster of Ohio troops in the Great War. But his grieving parents considered Dayton his home, and when the memorial was dedicated at Victory Oak Knoll in 1921 Stanley’s name was inscribed on the roll of honor there. A Dayton Doughboy rests in Scotland
At approximately 5:40pm on February 5, 1918, the skipper of the German u-boat UB-77 spotted the Anchor Line luxury liner SS TUSCANIA just a few miles off the Scottish island of Islay. UB-77 fired two torpedoes; one of them hit TUSCANIA squarely amidships. She did not sink immediately, but there was significant damage, and many of the lifeboats were destroyed in the resulting blast.
TUSCANIA had been pressed into service as an American troopship, and was carrying 2000 US soldiers, including members of three aero squadrons, elements of the 32nd Division, and the 6th Battalion, 20th Engineer Regiment (Forestry). Aboard TUSCANIA was twenty-three year-old Stanley Roy Augspurger. Born in Woodsdale, Butler County, Ohio, Stanley moved to Dayton with his parents in 1910 or 1911. They lived at 133 East Ridge Avenue. Stanley’s father, Walter, worked as a railroad dispatcher. When America entered the Great War in 1917, Stanley was working for the U.S. Forest Service in Oregon. He joined, appropriately enough, the 20th Engineers, one of the two huge regiments recruited from trained foresters and lumbermen, and designated specifically to harvest timber in France.
TUSCANIA did not sink immediately. It was nearly 10 o’clock that night before the liner slipped beneath the surface. The destroyers in its convoy did what they could to rescue the survivors, and indeed most of the men aboard did survive, but 230 — 201 American servicemen plus 29 members of the crew — were lost.
The men and boys of Port Ellen, Isle of Islay, turned out that night to search for survivors. They didn’t find any. What they did find were scores of bodies, washed up on the shores of Islay. These they recovered, identified as they could, and buried. Still on Islay today are four American cemeteries, at Port Charlotte, Kilnaughton, Kinabus, and Killeyan.
Stanley Augspurger was one of those who didn’t survive the sinking of TUSCANIA. He is buried in the American cemetery at Kinabus, Isle of Islay. Because he had enlisted in Oregon, his service wasn’t credited to the state of Ohio, and his name doesn’t appear on the official roster of Ohio troops in the Great War. But his grieving parents considered Dayton his home, and when the memorial was dedicated at Victory Oak Knoll in 1921 Stanley’s name was inscribed on the roll of honor there.

A Dayton Doughboy rests in Scotland

At approximately 5:40pm on February 5, 1918, the skipper of the German u-boat UB-77 spotted the Anchor Line luxury liner SS TUSCANIA just a few miles off the Scottish island of Islay. UB-77 fired two torpedoes; one of them hit TUSCANIA squarely amidships. She did not sink immediately, but there was significant damage, and many of the lifeboats were destroyed in the resulting blast.

TUSCANIA had been pressed into service as an American troopship, and was carrying 2000 US soldiers, including members of three aero squadrons, elements of the 32nd Division, and the 6th Battalion, 20th Engineer Regiment (Forestry). Aboard TUSCANIA was twenty-three year-old Stanley Roy Augspurger. Born in Woodsdale, Butler County, Ohio, Stanley moved to Dayton with his parents in 1910 or 1911. They lived at 133 East Ridge Avenue. Stanley’s father, Walter, worked as a railroad dispatcher. When America entered the Great War in 1917, Stanley was working for the U.S. Forest Service in Oregon. He joined, appropriately enough, the 20th Engineers, one of the two huge regiments recruited from trained foresters and lumbermen, and designated specifically to harvest timber in France.

TUSCANIA did not sink immediately. It was nearly 10 o’clock that night before the liner slipped beneath the surface. The destroyers in its convoy did what they could to rescue the survivors, and indeed most of the men aboard did survive, but 230 — 201 American servicemen plus 29 members of the crew — were lost.

The men and boys of Port Ellen, Isle of Islay, turned out that night to search for survivors. They didn’t find any. What they did find were scores of bodies, washed up on the shores of Islay. These they recovered, identified as they could, and buried. Still on Islay today are four American cemeteries, at Port Charlotte, Kilnaughton, Kinabus, and Killeyan.

Stanley Augspurger was one of those who didn’t survive the sinking of TUSCANIA. He is buried in the American cemetery at Kinabus, Isle of Islay. Because he had enlisted in Oregon, his service wasn’t credited to the state of Ohio, and his name doesn’t appear on the official roster of Ohio troops in the Great War. But his grieving parents considered Dayton his home, and when the memorial was dedicated at Victory Oak Knoll in 1921 Stanley’s name was inscribed on the roll of honor there.

Sweaters, sweaters, sweaters.
Things the ladies at home could knit for the boys Over There, from a 1918 pattern book.
Pretty fashionable stuff.

"Mild? Sure…"
Chesterfield ad, 1917.

OLD MEDIA AND NEW DISCOVERIES

Two things to bring to your attention: first, the new page on this site — Media. Here we’ll link audio and video content relating to the Great War Dayton project as it comes up. Right now that includes two interviews on WHIO’s “Miami Valley Voices” with Ron Rollins and Paul Lockhart.

Second — much of interest is just coming to light in archival collections in the region and in private hands.…

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